Crew_Life In the world of aviation, we define our flight crew as personnel who operate an aircraft while in flight. Typically, our flight crew is comprised of a captain, first officer, and 1-2 flight attendants. When you join the ExpressJet family, you will hear some crew life terms that you will need to familiarize yourself with. Below are a few of the terms you’ll hear at an aviation career:

Reserve: New-hire pilots typically begin on reserve, which means they do not have a set schedule for the month and instead fulfill an on-call role for the airline. Even though the pilot may not know exactly where he or she is flying, they know which days they are on-call and which days they are off. Our reserve pilots are guaranteed 75 hours of pay each month at $37-40/hr. regardless if they hold a line or not.

Junior Man: In a seniority based system, the most junior pilots are called first to cover trips. Crew Scheduling will call junior pilots and assign them trips to cover if they are available. ExpressJet also offers voluntary “call me first” options for pilots who wish to pick up additional trips.

Crew Scheduling: The Crew Scheduling or Crew Support department is responsible for creating and revising schedules of pilots and flight attendants. They schedule the flight crew based on FAA regulations, labor work rules and company policy.

Operation Support Center (OSC): Commonly referred to as Operation Control Center (OCC) at other airlines, the OSC is a central coordination hub that supports our 1,800 flights each day through pre-planning, flight monitoring, crew scheduling and other essential tasks.

Overnight: The term used when our flight crew has to spend the night away from their home because of their flight obligations. ExpressJet has attractive overnight stays in Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.

We want to help you make the smart choice for your future by providing you with the information you need to know. If you have any questions about our crew life or work rules, visit flysmartchoice.com. In the upcoming weeks, we will be bringing you more aviation vocab terms.

Check out the other articles in our Aviation Vocab 101 Series:

Three times a year we open our doors to invite students from across the country to experience all that ExpressJet has to offer. Fortunately for us, we consistently have the privilege to host the best and brightest individuals who have a passion for aviation. During this summer session we have four new interns joining our team for the next few months.

Meet our new interns:

Meet Stacy Gonzalez, Flight Operations Safety

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Stacy attended Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Prescott where she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Psychology and Safety in May 2016. Immediately after graduating she joined the ExpressJet team as an intern. Thus far, her favorite part of the experience has been the flexibility she receives to work in various safety related departments allowing her a panoramic view of the daily functions of one of the largest departments at ExpressJet. Her goal for the internship is to continue to work alongside various safety groups and to establish a foundation of knowledge that will be beneficial toward her career goals.

Meet Terrence Braddock, Flight Operations Safety

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Terrence is an involved senior-level student at Middle Tennessee State University where he is majoring in Aerospace with a Professional Pilot concentration and a Flight Dispatch add-on. The highlight of his experience thus far has been the welcoming personalities and gestures made by the ExpressJet team as a whole. Many of our employees mention how they feel welcomed and a part of the team on day one. He hopes to learn more about 121 operations and the airline industry in general. His goal is to one day become a check airman for a respected airline.

Meet Brian Reedy, Flight Operations

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Brian attends Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Daytona where he is a double major in Aviation Business Administration and Aeronautical Science. Similar to his peers, his favorite part of the internship experience has been the friendly and uplifting environment at ExpressJet. From this experience he hopes to learn how an airline develops company culture. Many professionals in the industry consider ExpressJet to be highly recognized and respected. At some point during his experience he hopes to see what different departments are doing to ensure that the culture is held to such a high standard and held constant when the company is spread out over the entire eastern half of the United States. Long term, it is Brian’s goal to end up in a management position at an airline after serving as a pilot for at least a decade.

Meet Ryan Adler, Flight Operations

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Ryan Adler is a student at the University of North Dakota majoring in Commercial Aviation and Aviation Management. Thus far, his program highlight has been the autonomy in fulfilling assignments and the workplace respect he has received from the pilot recruiters that he works alongside. Being immersed in the internal operations of an airline is a priceless experience that most people won’t receive until they are a full-time employee. There are so many opportunities to contribute within the airline other than being a pilot, and Ryan knows he wants to be more involved than flying the line one day as a full -time employee. Similar to most young aviators, he hopes to fly for a major airline one day. However at some point he hopes to transition into a management position at an airline.

 

You too can become an ExpressJet intern. For more information please visit, http://blog.expressjet.com/intern/.

 

 

As an extension of our recent work rules vocabulary article, we’re bringing you a new installment in our Aviation Vocab 101 series. Check out the first story in our series: Aviation Vocab 101: Work Rules Safety Programs Breakdown At the core of every airline, regional and major, is a commitment to safety. ExpressJet has one of the strongest safety records in the airline industry thanks to our crews, mechanics and operations team members’ focus on safety in their every day actions. There are Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mandated safety programs that carriers must follow, and several programs that ExpressJet participates in voluntarily to be proactive in safety.  ExpressJet is committed to providing our crews and passengers with the safest environment possible. Highlighted below are only a few of the programs that we incorporate into our daily operations here at ExpressJet:

Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP): The purpose of ASAP is to identify and reduce safety concerns, minimize deviations from Federal Aviation Regulations, and implement corrective measures that manage the risks as part of Safety Systems at ExpressJet. ASAP provides our pilots, dispatchers, mechanics, and flight attendants at ExpressJet with a voluntary, cooperative, non-punitive environment for candid reporting.

Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA): FOQA is a safety program that provides insight into potential safety risks, procedural compliance, aircraft health, and operational efficiencies through routine analysis of Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) data. The program is completely voluntary and is operated under a joint agreement between ExpressJet Airlines, the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) and the FAA.

Irregular Operations Report (IOR): IORs are the primary reporting program and two-way communication system of all events, recommendations, incidents, accidents and safety concerns to the Company, FAA and NTSB. It also creates a method for data collection, analysis, and dissemination to ExpressJet leadership, and allows the reporting employee to be informed of changes implemented based on their report and.or recommendation.

Safety Management System (SMS):  ExpressJet was the first regional airline to voluntarily implement the Safety Management System (SMS) program prior to it being required. SMS is a systematic and comprehensive process for managing risk and ensuring that our risk control methods are effective.

Line Operation Safety Audit (LOSA): A collaborative safety audit that places trained observers on flight deck jumpseats to collect safety-related data on environmental conditions, operational complexity and flight crew performance. The data are controlled, reviewed, analyzed and reported on by the LOSA Collaborative. This safety initiative has been recognized as an industry best practice for flight deck safety. ExpressJet conducted its first LOSA in April 2010.

We want to help you make the smart choice for your future by providing you with the information you need to know. If you have any questions about our safety programs, visit http://blog.expressjet.com/safety/

Check out the other articles in our Aviation Vocab 101 Series:

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Our Airline Pilot Pathway Program (AP3) team and EPIC Ambassadors have been working insistently to provide our AP3 students with an engaging summer away from campus. During the summer, we have several opportunities available for our AP3 students to remain engaged with us. We want to make sure everyone is in-the-know on the latest AP3 happenings at ExpressJet.

Here’s an overview of everything going on:

 AP3 Breakdown

  • 58 schools
  • 896 students
  • 201 conditional job offers (CJOs)
  • 144 EPIC Ambassadors
  • 59 AP3 grads at ExpressJet

 AP3 Summer Camp

  • Camp is an extension of our commitment of educating, engaging, and empowering future aviators
  • Tailored to senior level students and/or certified flight instructors
  • Provides an opportunity for student pilots to explore, grow, develop new skills and form lasting relationships

#AP3SummerFun Video Contest

  • Opportunity for flight students to get creative to earn $1,000 for their organization or school
  • Video is required to highlight why you love aviation, your school and AP3
  • To enter, post your video on Facebook or Instagram with hashtag #AP3SummerFun between June 1 and Jul 13

AP3 Facebook Group

  • Group is exclusively for AP3 members
  • Check for events coming to your school, AP3 news, CJO recipients and more

Facility Tours

  • Behind-the-scenes tour of ExpressJet’s facilities including our airport crew lounge, Flight Ops training center, maintenance hangar and Operation Support Center (OSC)
  • Pilot shadow experience

Pilot Recruiting Events

Our AP3 team is committed to keeping you engaged during this summer and on the clear path from our partner schools to the right seat at ExpressJet. Feel free to contact Captain Joey Cook, joey.cook@expressjet.com, with any questions about AP3.

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Former ExpressJet Flight Ops intern Marcel Graham (left) is serving as a CFI at AeroSim Flight Academy to earn his hours

Student pilots who pursue degrees typically graduate without having the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mandated 1500 hours of total flight time. Graduates average slightly higher than 300 hours of total time by the end of their senior year. This leads to students pursuing other avenues to build their time until they are ready to start their commercial aviation career. While there are many options to build your flight time, most pilots opt to become a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) to build time.

As a CFI you will be responsible for instructing student pilots in flight procedures and techniques, preparing instructional lessons and monitoring student performances. This option is advantageous because you are building your flight time in a structured environment, being compensated for your instruction and impacting the life of another aspiring pilot simultaneously.

Some of the advantages of becoming a CFI include:

  • Gaining familiarity with how to appropriately respond to unforeseen weather, aircraft trouble and air traffic
  • Networking with individuals who have a like-minded passion for aviation
  • Log Pilot-In-Command time while providing flight instruction

Everyone’s timeline to 1500 hours is different, depending on the variety of students you are able to teach (the more certificates you hold, the more diverse your students can be), the enrollment size of your flight school, the amount of flight instructors currently working at the school and the size of the fleet available.  Most instructors report that it takes about a year and a half to accumulate 1500 hours.

If you are a member of the Airline Pilot Pathway Program (AP3) you are required to be a Certified Flight Instructor to build your total time. We recommend serving as a CFI because of its structured learning environment and because you’re supporting the next generation of aviators, though we consider candidates who build their time through any route.

And remember, you’ll earn 40-80 hours toward your ATP/R-ATP in ExpressJet’s new hire training so we encourage you to apply when you’re within six months of earning your hours. We also provide the ATP CTP Course for free (always!) in-house as part of paid training. When you’re ready, complete your application at expressjet.com/apply or AirlineApps.

Good luck building your hours!

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